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How to ask for feedback after a job rejection

How to ask for feedback after a job rejection
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It can be difficult to learn that you did not get the job for which you applied. But after all, it is important to keep in mind that you can learn a lot from rejection through your job search journey. Job application requires a lot of steps to to through and because of that sometimes it's tempting to merely move on to the next job posting after learning that you were rejected. In the long run, nevertheless, it might be helpful to your career to solicit constructive criticism. Job seekers should always apply some of their overall knowledge when applying for a job, as a job seeker is important while they're on their job search journey to always read thoroughly the whole job vacancy.

Immediately after learning that you won't be hired, ask for feedback from the hiring manager. This serves a purpose:  it gives you the chance to make a positive first impression when the reason they selected the individual will still be fresh in their minds. Call the hiring manager as soon as possible after receiving an email rejection, preferably within the first 48 hours. You can use the feedback to improve your interview skills and boost your chances of getting a job offer in your next interview.

In this article, you will be guided on how to ask for feedback after job rejection. Hopefully, you will get a better understanding of how to do it.

Ways to ask for feedback after a job rejection advice 

Getting constructive feedback from the hiring manager will help you soothe those negative vibes and fill you with a positive outlook for the future. The best approach to handle this is always over the phone, never over email. Phone conversations let you establish a rapport with the person, whereas sending an email asking for feedback requires the recipient to put in extra effort to respond. It also makes you seem less genuine over email as it requires less work on your side as well. Consider your interview application as a networking opportunity by responding to a job rejection email. Building relationships in the business world is crucial if you want to advance your career.

Here are some tips from experts on how to ask for feedback after a job rejection from the hiring manager. Following up after being turned down enables you to establish a good relationship with the employer (but only if done in the right way). This will make you stand out because most applicants will probably delete a rejection email and not reply to it. 

There are three reasons why doing this is crucial. Sometimes the chosen candidate changes their mind and declines to begin, the chosen candidate starts the job but isn't a good fit and quits after a short while, or the hiring manager has a vacancy for another position for which you might be qualified. Crafting a strong cover letter and resume is a critical part of the job search that many candidates struggle with.

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How to ask for feedback after a job rejection email

It's better to email the hiring manager if you've been communicating with them by email; otherwise, if you've been calling frequently, your recruiter will be delighted to speak with you on the phone after the job interview. A simple phone call won't cover everything you have to say, like the email does. Never forget to thank the person for their time and the opportunity to learn, regardless of how strongly you disagree with the critique. Never forget the company name and the role you applied for. Your learning experience will be enriched from criticism and feedback.

Here are some email examples of how to ask for feedback after a job rejection via email to hiring managers:

  • "It was nice meeting you, but I'm regretful I didn't get a job offer from your company. I was hoping you could tell me what I did well during the interview process and what I should have done differently because \self-improvement is important to me."
  • "I was looking forward to the job, but I realize that is not going to happen. In my opinion, one should always be able to learn from setbacks. Can you let me know what I can work on in the future?”
  • Thank you for the consideration for the position of x. I'm hoping you'll give me a little more of your time so I can ask a few questions about how I could have presented myself more effectively. I really believe that we can learn from every event, and I intend to use the advice you give me to advance my abilities.
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How to reach out to HR and ask for feedback after job rejection

Approaching an individual you’ve built a rapport with is quite different from emailing HR and knowing that the whole team will see your email. If that is something you don't like and find difficult to deal with. Here we will show you the proper way to reach out to HR and ask for feedback after job rejection. 

A great message will communicate dissatisfaction, demonstrate empathy, request feedback, and indicate a desire in continuing the conversation. It's crucial to sound calm since if you appear irritated, they will be less likely to provide you with any information. Request for some feedback or improvements that could be made to your cover letter for instance, or anything that might interest you. This way you will be able to learn from your experience to become a qualified candidate for another job opportunity, always stay positive because you never know what the near future holds so keep an eye on how you will be moving forward, never burn bridges.

You could, for instance, write:

Thank you for letting me know the decision.

I'm sorry we won't be working together right now, but I'm glad you were able to find what you were searching for. 

Could you provide me any input regarding the discrepancy between your requirements and what I presented? I’m always thinking of self-improvement and your input will help me greatly in my continued search.

I cherish having you in my network and hope you will get in touch with me in the future if I can ever be of help.

Regards and thanks

Your Name

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If they do offer any input, be sure to politely thank them; never dispute or become aggressive. They might make you their backup plan if their initial choice doesn't work out. In reality, the only way to find out why you were passed over for a job is to ask why. Keep in mind to be considerate. Send a nice, humble follow-up email after receiving a job rejection. Express your sadness and thank the recruiting manager for letting you know you weren't selected.

Make sure to request honest feedback. If you don't know where you went wrong, how can you hope to improve?  Ask for suggestions on how you may strengthen your application for a job and for comments. Do some research into other job opportunities that pique your interest, there are endless opportunities out there. Best of luck in your job hunt.

Reflect on the rejection feedback

Whether you received feedback automatically or specifically requested it, you can apply this advice to any feedback you receive after a job rejection. Reflect a lot on why you did not get this dream job of yours.

Here are some ideas for using job rejection feedback after receiving your rejection: 

- Work on any weaknesses pointed out to you in the critique. 

- Get over it! Yes, it’s hard to move on from a job rejection. But the sooner you accept it, the sooner you’ll be ready to apply for another one. 

- Try to see it as an opportunity in disguise. If you’ve had negative job rejection feedback, consider how you can turn that experience into a positive one and improve yourself as a person. 

- Keep your chin up! It’s not easy to hear that a job position perfect for you wasn’t the best fit for the company or team; however, keep in mind that the interview process is a two-way street. 

You want an employer that fits you and your goals at work, so make sure you find one that makes you happy and is a good fit for your skills and background. So why does it feel like such a blow when feedback is negative? Well, remember that feedback is just that: feedback. It doesn’t mean you’re less competent as a candidate or that there’s something wrong with you.

Asking for feedback after your application is rejected is an excellent way to get constructive criticism so you can figure out what went wrong and continue to refine your application process. It can be pretty empowering if you think of job rejection feedback as part of your overall growth as an employee and a manager. 

Rejection feedback conclusion

Even though it may seem counter-intuitive, you’re not necessarily trying to get a “yes” out of this feedback round. The goal here is to ensure that your other job seeker was a good candidate, that they understood your job requirements, and that they had a positive experience with the interview process. So even if the feedback isn’t what you asked for, it’s still important to get it.

At Incognito for Slack, we believe that interviewing should be about the candidate and their potential on the job. When we send feedback after a job rejection, we try to focus on helping candidates learn from the process, rather than focusing on their shortcomings. We want them to walk away feeling better about themselves and confident in their abilities going forward. And by being honest about why your other job seeker didn’t get the job, it will more likely lead to a positive reflection on their process and you as an employer.

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For example, if you say something like “Your qualifications align well with our cultural values and work style here at Incognito for Slack. You’re highly qualified and would make a great candidate in the future, but our team has decided to hire internally”. This positive feedback can help set your other job seeker up for success in future interviews and applications. They might wonder why they didn’t get this particular job, but they won’t wonder if they were qualified or whether they have the right skillset to do the job well.

Job seekers don’t always get rejected because they aren’t qualified or don’t have the skills needed. Sometimes they might not be invested in the position yet or might think that you aren’t interested in them as a candidate. So by providing honest feedback after a rejection, you give your other job seeker an opportunity to re-evaluate their application and make adjustments for future interviews in a positive way.

We know how difficult it can be waiting for feedback after an interview, and sometimes the hiring process take weeks or months to be done. It can be hard to know what to focus on during the time between submitting your application and hearing back from an employer. Keep in mind that the interviewing skills will improve with experience.

We try to help candidates give feedback by offering them easy-to-use templates that are only a click away! We hope these templates help you guide your candidates through this feedback process so they can get back on track as soon as possible.

Have you ever gotten such feedback? Share with us your experience in the comments.